Blog

Knocks in the night

Posted by on Mar 15, 2014 in home | 0 comments

So, last night I was winding up my evening and during a wind storm there 4 or five quick knocks at my door. That’s it. Yea, not going to answer that. Then a minute or two later some noise at one of my windows. Up the stairs I go, right to my nightstand and grab my 9mm and settle back in my chair. Not too smart people :-) You never know who is armed and who isn’t lol! This at 10:50 at night.

Urban Legends and FaceBook

Posted by on Feb 20, 2014 in FaceBook | 0 comments

Urban Legends and FaceBook

I call bullshit

It is amazing how many people will simply share something on FB that they read and believe to be true. The latest that I have come across is the Pepsi can that leaves off the words “under god” in the allegiance. A quick search (usually Snopes.com) will reveal most of these hoaxes/urban legends. Please people, be responsible and exercise a bit of free-thinking and look before you leap.

iPhone 6 Rumors

Posted by on Feb 17, 2014 in iPhone, MAC, technology | 0 comments

iPhone 6 Rumors

Lots of rumors are swirling around concerning the next iteration of iPhone. Here is a mock up that is gorgeous!

iPhone-6-2

My Niece, Ella

Posted by on Feb 16, 2014 in family | 0 comments

Classes

Posted by on Feb 16, 2014 in academics, technology | 0 comments

Classes

 

I have enrolled in two classes starting later this month [feb'14].

  • Genomic Medicine Gets Personal
  • Historical Relic Treasures and Cultural China: Part 1

Genomic Medicine Gets Personal

While the advances in genomics promise to usher in a new era in medical practice and create a major paradigm shift in patient care, the social impact of genomic medicine will be equally significant. The information and potential use of genomic discoveries are no longer issues left for scientists and medical professionals to handle, but have become ones for the public at large. Rarely a day passes without a genomics-related story reported in the media. By the end of this course, students will be able to better understand the field of genomics; be familiar with various online databases and resources; and understand and appreciate the medical, social, ethical, and legal issues associated with the availability of personal genomic information.

Historical Relic Treasures and Cultural China: Part 1

Chinese archaeology is one of the fastest-growing and most exciting fields of study in China. With a wealth of cultural relics unearthed this past century, the world’s fascination with China’s rich history has been renewed. This course will examine 15 unique cultural relics identified by scholars as important to Chinese civilization. We will focus on the fields of agriculture, astronomy, music, metallurgy, textiles, architecture, painted pottery, jade articles, bronze ware, shipbuilding and acupuncture. We will ignite your curiosity as we explore how these treasures reveal China’s past, and guide the future of Chinese culture.

考古学在中国是发展最快且最令人兴奋的研究领域之一。在上个世纪,中国凭借丰富的文物出土,让世界在此沉迷在其悠久的历史之中。本课程将探讨15个被学者认定为对中国文明有着重要意义的独特文物。我们将专注于农业、天文、音乐、冶金、纺织、建筑、彩陶、玉器、青铜器、造船和针灸等领域。通过探索这些珍品是如何揭示中国的过去,并引导中国文化的未来,我们将点燃你的好奇心。

 

Academia

Wow, this is odd…

Posted by on Feb 16, 2014 in MAC, technology | 0 comments

Wow, this is odd…

I admit I bring my iPad into the bathroom sometimes….but this is a bit much.

TP an iPad go together LOL

Amazon Paperwhite Review

Posted by on Feb 16, 2014 in technology | 0 comments

Amazon Paperwhite Review

Kindle Paperwhite

I have had my Amazon Kindle Paperwhite for 6 months. I love it. I have spent endless hours reading on it and not a problem.

The batter life is fantastic. If I read for a week straight I still have battery left. It is light and compact. I purchased the optional cover which really dresses it up and protects it well. Here are the details from Amazon’s site:


 

Display Amazon’s 6″ Paperwhite display with exclusive Carta e-paper technology and next-generation built-in light, 212 ppi, optimized font technology, 16-level gray scale
Size 6.7″ x 4.6″ x 0.36″ (169 mm x 117 mm x 9.1 mm)
Weight 7.3 ounces (206 grams)
Actual size and weight may vary by configuration and manufacturing process
System Requirements None; fully wireless and doesn’t require a computer to download content
On-Device Storage 2 GB internal (approximately 1.25 GB available for user content). Holds up to 1,100 books
Cloud Storage Free cloud storage for all Amazon content
Battery Life A single charge lasts up to eight weeks, based on a half hour of reading per day with wireless off and the light setting at 10. Battery life will vary based on light and wireless usage
Charge Time Fully charges in approximately 4 hours from a computer via USB cable
Wi-Fi Connectivity Supports public and private Wi-Fi networks or hotspots that use the 802.11b, 802.11g, or 802.11n standard with support for WEP, WPA and WPA2 security using password authentication or Wi-Fi Protected Setup (WPS)
Content Formats Supported Kindle Format 8 (AZW3), Kindle (AZW), TXT, PDF, unprotected MOBI, PRC natively; HTML, DOC, DOCX, JPEG, GIF, PNG, BMP through conversion
Documentation Quick Start Guide (included in box); Kindle Paperwhite User Guide (pre-installed on device) [PDF]. Additional information in multiple languages available online
Warranty and Service 1-year limited warranty and service included. Optional 2-year Extended Warranty available for U.S. customers sold separately. Use of Kindle is subject to the terms found here
Included in the Box Kindle Paperwhite, USB 2.0 charging cable and Quick Start Guide

Human History, Written on our Genes

Posted by on Feb 15, 2014 in archaeology, science | 0 comments

Human History, Written on our Genes

Very interesting with far reaching possibilites.

OXFORD, ENGLAND—A team of scientists sequenced DNA samples from 1,490 modern people from 95 genetically distinct populations, and developed a statistical method to make inferences about which populations had interbred over the past 4,000 years. Evidence of “mixing events” was found in 80 of the populations, and some of those events coincide with historical records, such as the Hazara people of Afghanistan and Pakistan, who had an influx of Mongol DNA around the time that the Mongol Empire expanded. Team member Simon Myers of the University of Oxford told Nature News that he would like to expand the model by using larger sample sizes and by adding ancient DNA samples. “That will give us a deeper understanding of human history,” he explained.

 

I Love Photos

Posted by on Feb 14, 2014 in archaeology, photos, travel | 0 comments

I Love Photos

One of the many wall of photos in my house :-)

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